Brownbag@Ismaharif 12/4/19

Brownbag@Ismaharif 12/4/19

Brownbag Session: 12 April 2019 2pm @ AS4 02-08

Ismaharif, our graduate student, will be presenting his research on “Taking part and taking sides: A multi-goal, multi-mean approach to understanding third-party participation in intergroup conflict”

Find out more about his research below~ Be there or be square!

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Taking part and taking sides: A multi-goal, multi-mean approach to understanding third-party participation in intergroup conflict

Abstract
Conflicts between groups are prevalent and persistent around the world. Especially in this digital age, these conflicts are rarely kept private between disputants as lay third parties are typically present to observe the dispute. As third parties, they often pick sides and/or participate in these conflicts. Prominent examples of third parties include self-radicalized extremists or mobilized violent protestors. Yet, third-party responses to intergroup conflict receives little attention in experimental research. Further complicating the research is how third parties typically are pursuing different goals simultaneously, and have diverse options (e.g., posting on Facebook vs. taking up arms to kill) available for them to choose from. Using a goal systemic perspective, we examined how third parties participate in intergroup conflicts and investigated the motivations underlying third-party behavior. Using instrumentality maps of social and moral goals, we were able to predict third parties’ costly participation in intergroup conflict across multiple concurrent means. Furthermore, hostile behavior against the outgroup could be explained as a function of ingroup love and moral concerns, rather than outgroup hate. These findings underscore the importance of a multi-goal, multi-mean perspective in behavioral research.

Brownbag@Yia Chin 9/4/19

Brownbag@Yia Chin 9/4/19

Brownbag Session: 9 April 2019 4pm @ AS4 02-08

Yia Chin, our graduate student, will be presenting her research on “Facing death together: Engaging in mortality salience with others buffers death anxiety”

Find out more about her research below~ Be there or be square!
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Facing death together: Engaging in mortality salience with others buffers death anxiety

Abstract
Past research focused on inducing mortality salience as a solitary experience. In real life however (eg. at hospitals, or when people receive broadcasted news of tragic incidents), people may contemplate their mortality with social others. Our present research hence investigated if contemplating death thoughts together with others can preemptively alleviate the death anxiety induced. Participants were either led to believe that they are doing the mortality salience task alone (i.e. alone condition) or together with their fellow participants (i.e. shared reality condition). Results revealed that mortality salience participants in the alone condition have increased death anxiety. There is however, no significant increase in death anxiety for mortality salience participants in the shared reality condition. This suggests that death anxiety is preemptively alleviated when people contemplate about mortality as a shared experience. Our findings join previous research in demonstrating the importance of relatedness (via having a shared reality) in buffering death anxiety.