Brownbag@Jethro 20/4/18

Brownbag@Jethro 20/4/18

Brownbag Session: 20 April 2018 1pm @ AS4 02-08

Jethro, our graduate student, will be presenting his research on
“See something say something: How feasibility and desirability concerns affect intention to report a person exhibiting extreme behaviours”

Find out more about his research below~ Be there or be square!
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See something say something: How feasibility and desirability concerns affect intention to report a person exhibiting extreme behaviours

Abstract
In several cases of terror attacks, it has been reported that family members and friends do notice warning signs in the radicalised individual in the days leading to the attack, but did not to report these radicalised persons to the relevant help or services. This happens despite efforts to encourage citizens to report suspicious activities to the authorities. One way to understand this phenomenon is to explore how feasibility and desirability concerns affect the decision-making process of reporting someone. A series of studies were conducted to explore how feasibility and desirability concerns interact with individual traits to affect intention to report a person exhibiting extreme behaviours.

Brownbag@Shaun 14/4/18

Brownbag@Shaun 14/4/18

Brownbag Session: 14 April 2018 1pm @ AS4 02-08

Shaun, our graduate student, will be presenting his research on
“A look at improving motivation through celebrations”

Find out more about his research below~ Be there or be square!

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A look at improving motivation through celebrations

Abstract
Previous research has shown that—in group settings—member recognition, group identification, and progress expectation affect the achievement motivation of group members. Two studies were conducted to extend this research by exploring interaction effects of these three factors within group celebrations, focusing on two specific components of members’ group identification: superiority and commitment. Further research into this novel field of group celebrations is recommended.

Brownbag@Huixiang 6/4/18

Brownbag@Huixiang 6/4/18

Brownbag Session: 6 April 2018 1pm @ AS4 02-08

Huixiang, our graduate student, will be presenting her research on “Inspirational immigrants: How uplifting stories of migrant workers impact Singaporeans’ Goal Pursuit”

Find out more about her research below~ Be there or be square!
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Inspirational immigrants: How uplifting stories of migrant workers impact Singaporeans’ Goal Pursuit

Abstract
Research on inspiration has increased in recent years. Thrash and Elliot (2003) define inspiration as a two-part process – being inspired by something and being inspired to do something. However, as inspiration is viewed as a spontaneous experience, almost no research studies have attempted to directly manipulate inspiration. Noting the typical perception of qualities such as optimism, grit and resilience in immigrants, two experiments were conducted to investigate if inspiration could be manipulated through narratives about immigrants. Results indicated that Bangladeshi immigrants were the most inspirational to participants compared to British immigrants and Singaporeans. As inspiration is theorized to have a motivational impact, participants’ goal-striving motivation was also examined.